Female Ejaculation

Female ejaculation is the expulsion of fluid by females from the para-urethral ducts through and around the urethra during or before an orgasm. (The urethra is the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the exterior). Female ejaculation is also known colloquially as gushing or squirting.

In surveys, 35–50% of women report that they have at some time experienced the gushing of fluid during orgasm. Reports on the volume of fluid expelled vary considerably. The exact source and nature of the fluid continue to be a topic of debate among medical professionals, which is also related to doubts over the existence of the G-Spot.

In the course of sexual stimulation, the female urethra begins to enlarge and can be felt easily. It swells out greatly at the end of orgasm, occasionally the production of fluids is profuse. One can see that large quantities of a clear transparent fluid are expelled not from the vagina, but out of the urethra. Urinary incontinence during sex is a common problem affecting women. A recent study of women who report ejaculation, however, found no evidence of any urological problems, suggesting the two conditions (ejaculation and coital incontinence) are quite distinct physiologically.

The discussion entered popular culture in 1982 with the publication of the best-selling book ‘The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries about Human Sexuality’ by Ladas, Whipple, and Perry. The book discussed female ejaculation and brought the issue back into discussions of women’s sexuality both in the medical community and among the general public. The chapter on ‘Female Ejaculation’ is largely based on anecdotal testimony, and illustrates another issue in the debate, the weight placed on anecdotes and small numbers of observations rather than medical research or clinical trials. Importantly, a number of the women stated that they had been diagnosed with urinary incontinence.

Whilst there exists a large volume of medical research into male sexual function and dysfunction, female sexuality has been historically excluded from detailed investigation. Thus, we continue to have a limited understanding of this subject. Increased production of fluid at orgasm is a physiological phenomenon and should not cause concern, however, if you are distressed by any symptoms you may be experiencing during sex, seek advice from a gynaecologist.